collapse

* Recent Topics

Brother & sister sit for portrait by Lynnya
[Today at 09:57:19 AM]


Corpus Christi Catholic School 2004 by Lynnya
[Today at 09:55:11 AM]


In the library by Lynnya
[Today at 09:53:45 AM]


Young man Faucheaus by Candice
[Yesterday at 11:53:50 PM]


In the Glare by Lynnya
[Yesterday at 02:39:23 PM]


Chic '20s Bride by Shadow
[October 17, 2021, 09:31:41 PM]


Happy Bride by Lynnya
[October 15, 2021, 06:44:01 PM]


Toddler with her parents covered in splotches by Jo Ann Snover
[October 13, 2021, 07:08:32 PM]


NPR in LaPlace by Mhayes
[October 11, 2021, 10:53:30 PM]


Missing information by Lynnya
[October 11, 2021, 07:03:43 PM]

Author Topic: Help with these legs?  (Read 7715 times)

Offline schmoken

  • OPR Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Help with these legs?
« on: September 11, 2006, 09:53:10 PM »
This is my first serious photo restoration. It has taken me a while, but now I'm down to working on this little guys legs. His left one shouldn't be too much of a problem, so, naturally, I took on the harder right leg first.
I'm having a heck of a time getting a natural look around the heavy white damage. My latest attempt was using a pattern made from a decent part of the overalls. Getting rid of the white is the easy part, but without some wrinkles and shadows, it looks obviously fake. What would be my best course of action here?

Before:


In progress (don't flame me on the hair, it's a work in progress  :P }:


100% crop of area in question:


thanks!

Offline glennab

  • OPR Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 3226
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2006, 10:26:27 PM »
Hi Schmoken

I can only think of one possibility to help find some of the detail in his leg and foot.  Even if you can't actually use it in the image, you might be able to pull out some detail that will help you clone.

If you're using Photoshop, copy the original file, duplicate the layer and set the layer effect to multiply.  Sometimes that will pull out detail that you wouldn't ordinarily see when you have a lightened area.  If you get a little detail, try the same method on a third and even a fourth layer.  Can't promise it'll work, but it's worth a try.

I've also found that I can catch detail by trying other layer effects.  It's amazing what you can get, even if it's only to give a template from which to work.

Other than that, all I can think to do is clone little bits at a time. The leg appears to have a little detail, but it's hard to tell on the monitor!  This one's a toughie! Good luck!
GG
What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world remains and is immortal. ~Albert Pine

(Photoshop CS5 /Mac Pro)

cmpentecost

  • Guest
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2006, 10:55:56 PM »
Assuming you are using Photoshop, have you tried clicking on the 3 different channels (red, green blue) to see what shows up.  The reason I say this is I have a photo where I thought the face was totally damaged and I'd have to do plastic surgery.  However, after clicking on the 3 different channels. his face became almost 100% visible under the blue channel.  ( I'm still reading up on how to bring out the best channel, but, at least I can see what the actual picture looks like).  Perhaps this might work to see what his pants leg looks like.

Hope this helps.

Christine

Offline happyheart

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
  • my feelings exactlly!
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2006, 07:13:18 PM »
I just returned from Photoshop World convention in Las Vegas, where channel blending was a topic taught by Dan Margulis.  Talk about a WOW! factor.  It basically works by using the Apply Image command to copy a channel into an image.   You can apply channels from another image providing it is open in memory, and is the exact same size in pixel count.  This could be nothing more than a duplicate copy of your working image.  It works something like this:

Work on a copy of the photo where you can flatten the layers.  Then make a duplicate copy of what is now your background layer.  After stepping through the channels to choose the one you want to use, select your copy layer as the layer to target.  Then choose the Apply Image command from the menu.  The source is where you are pulling the channel from, and the layer is your copy layer.  Channel is set to the channel you want to apply.  The bonus here is that you can use the blending modes inside the dialog.  So depending whether you need to darken, lighten, or keep the luminosity, choose the appropriate blend mode.  After applying the channel to the image, you can work with the blend modes of the layer and the opacity of the layer, as needed. 

Faces are usually found in the green channel, and applied with luminosity mode, but depending on the original, you may need to use lighten or darken mode if something is getting blown out.  You can also use a Curves or Levels layer applied with a clipping mask to increase the black and white information you are blending with the bottom layer.

Hope this isn't too confusing to everyone.  It takes a little experimentation, but really does work. ;)
If it's artsy or Photoshop, I'll give it a try!
aka Betty

cmpentecost

  • Guest
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2006, 07:36:35 PM »
Happy Heart,

First, I am incredibly jealous that you got to go to Photoshop World.  I've only been to one, in Orlando in 2004, that got significantly shortened due to Hurricane Frances.  I'm hoping to make Boston's PS World next spring, when CS3 comes out.

Anyway, thank you for the details on the channels.  I have a color photo that is heavily damaged, but an incredible amount of the original photo is visible in the blue channel (just in b & W instead of color).  I am going to use your technique on this photo, and see what happens.  Thanks for sharing this.   :)

Christine

Offline OPRAng

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 199
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2006, 08:40:45 PM »
Happy Heart,

By any chance did you see the OPR brochure when you were at the Photoshop World convention? We sent 4,000 brochures to Vegas. We have even gotten a few new volunteers because of it...I was just wondering if you saw it...

Thanks,
Angela
Angela Ellis
Treasurer
Operation Photo Rescue, Inc.
aellis@operationphotorescue.org
donate@operationphotorescue.org

Offline happyheart

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
  • my feelings exactlly!
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2006, 09:37:27 PM »
It was in each and every attendees packet!  I didn't find mine until I got home, but it was there.  I was sitting in class one day and saw on laying on the table.  I quizzed my neighbor about where it came from, and he told me that the person before me had left it there.  I actually 'recycled' it in a later session, as I was telling my new neighbor about this GREAT organization I was volunteering with.  It turns out she is a restoration artist and was very interested.  I gave her the brochure I had found, and asked her to be sure she looked us up and volunteered when she returned home. :up2:
If it's artsy or Photoshop, I'll give it a try!
aka Betty

Offline OPRAng

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 199
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2006, 09:56:54 PM »
You rock!

If you tell two friends, who tell two friends, who tell two friends, we can all be in a shampoo commercial!!!

Seriously though, that is such a great story to hear. I am thrilled that you are enjoyin gyour work with us so much that you would encourage others to join...That is wonderful!

Angela

Angela Ellis
Treasurer
Operation Photo Rescue, Inc.
aellis@operationphotorescue.org
donate@operationphotorescue.org

Offline happyheart

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
  • my feelings exactlly!
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2006, 10:52:31 PM »
You rock!

If you tell two friends, who tell two friends, who tell two friends, we can all be in a shampoo commercial!!!

Seriously though, that is such a great story to hear. I am thrilled that you are enjoyin gyour work with us so much that you would encourage others to join...That is wonderful!

Angela



Hey if we tell enough people, maybe we can get these 'difficult' photos out of here and get some more of the 'easy' and/or 'moderate'  ;D

Seriously, I love doing this stuff.  I have learned Soooooo much by doing this!  Every photo brings a new challenge, like not making it look like mud (!), and I feel like I am gaining as much as I am contributing.
If it's artsy or Photoshop, I'll give it a try!
aka Betty

Offline happyheart

  • OPR Long Time Hero
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
  • my feelings exactlly!
Re: Help with these legs?
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2006, 11:02:46 PM »
Happy Heart,

First, I am incredibly jealous that you got to go to Photoshop World.  I've only been to one, in Orlando in 2004, that got significantly shortened due to Hurricane Frances.  I'm hoping to make Boston's PS World next spring, when CS3 comes out.
Christine

That was actually my first one also!  We had just moved to West Palm Beach FL area, and it was well within driving distance, so I went.  I knew something was really wrong with my sense of direction, when I was the only one driving South after the conference was cut short for the hurricane.  Everyone else was heading North to get the heck out of Dodge!  ;D

I've also been lucky enough to go to the last two in Vegas.  Lucky for me, my husband loves Las Vegas so he considers it a vacation, and I attend Photoshop World.  Sounds like  deal to me, as otherwise I would feed the slot machines!

As for the channel technique, it's OK that the information is in b & w.  The trick is in choosing the right blend mode.  Luminosity will use the highlight/shadow information and combine it with the colors of the underlying layer.  Darken will darken anything lighter, but keep the color from below, while Lighten will do the reverse.  In a few instances, Dan used some of the other blend modes, but these three were the main ones he used.  He likened it to making the best Black and White picture you could and then combining it with the color information of your original.  The B&W info gives you the contrast and definition you need while the color livens it up a little.  The technique will work on strictly B & W or toned image though also.
If it's artsy or Photoshop, I'll give it a try!
aka Betty