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Author Topic: What was your first real camera?  (Read 778 times)
Mike S.
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« on: August 25, 2011, 09:05:55 PM »

Hello everyone,

My first real camera was a Nikon F.  My father-in-law got me into photography back in the 1960's and he had a Nikkormat which made me lean towards the Nikon cameras.  I spent about 6 months trying to decide what camera to buy.  I took my father-in-laws advice and never regretted it once.  The camera lasted for many years.  My son took my old (at that time) Nikon F to photography class in high school.  It was functioning just as well then as the day I bought it.  I eventually traded it in on 2   equipment but to this day have very fond memories of all the pictures I took with it.

What was your first real camera?

I have to give Schen credit for pointing me to this topic as he just told me about his first real camera.  Thanks Schen
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Mike S.
schen
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2011, 09:56:25 PM »

Here is my first real camera.  My high school math teacher had a Nikon F.  I like him and I like his camera.  I could not afford it since I was still a poor college student.  So I settled for a Nikomat.  I took many pictures with it.  It is a manual exposure with a built-in meter.  Unfortunately, the metering electronics use the earlier button battery that contains mercury.  I am not sure it is possible to find a replacement battery any more.  My daughter used it in her photography class because manual exposure was required.


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Hannie
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2011, 08:42:00 AM »

Fun topic!

My first real camera was a Praktica L, the simplest and cheapest model they made in the 70s. 
No built in meter so I bought a separate light meter, it was quite a nice camera.
Even after almost 40 years it still works, never had to be repaired! (I don't use it any more)
Isn't it funny how those old (cheap) cameras lasted so long and the modern ones always have one problem or another?  Roll Eyes

Hannie

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Hannie Scheltema
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lurch
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2011, 01:27:57 PM »

My first real camera was a Zeiss Contessa, handed down from my Dad when he graduated to a twin lens reflex. He got the Contessa from a pawn shop, so it probably dates back to the 40s (I had it before graduating high school in the early 50s). Can't provide a picture, 'cause it was stolen in a burglary in the early 70s. Amazing how recent that feels!
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schen
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2011, 07:47:38 PM »

Hannie, my camera does not have a shoe for the flash.  My TV sets went out of service in the reverse order of purchase.
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Mike S.
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2011, 08:26:05 PM »

Hannie, when they say they don't make them like that any more, they are not kidding.  The old ones just keep going and going until you run into a battery problem.  Had the same problem with our old Pentax Spot Meter.

Lurch, I remember the Zeiss Contessa.  A really nice camera.  Sometimes I think we would be better off going back to those types of cameras.  We had to think to use them since they were not all automatic and when you got a really great picture you could be proud.

Schen thanks for your comments.  Talking about flash, with my film cameras I had a Sunpak 622 SuperPro.  You could just about light up the other side of the moon with it.  I had to give it up because of weight.  Pat & I walked the Cup & Saucer Trail on Manitoulin Island in Canada.  One part of the trail is a cliff going straight up. It was not fun with a 30 lb pack of camera equipment.  Now I am down to about 8 lbs.
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Mike S.
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« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2011, 05:12:07 AM »

Shujen, it is called "creative engineering".   Wink

Hannie
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Hannie Scheltema
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